Chilled out Cilantro Lime Rice

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Rice is boring. There, I said it so you dont have to. Don’t get me wrong I eat a ton of brown rice but just boiling it with water or stock gets old fast. My motto is simply this: food should be enjoyed, every single bite of it. It’s so easy add some gusto when you have something like rice that is just begging to be elevated like fluffy little flavor pillows. This recipe would work great with quinoa or any variety of rice you could throw at it. Seriously though don’t throw it; this is a scrumptious recipe not a football game.

Prep time: 5 minutes
Cook time: 25-30 minutes
Serves: 2-3 people

Ingredients:

1 cup uncooked rice (any variety – I used brown) or quinoa
1 1/2 cups water (if using brown rice)img_5744-2
1 large handful fresh cilantro, rough chopped
1 lime, juiced
2 tbsp. grass-fed butter or unrefined virgin coconut oil
Sea salt and black pepper to taste

 

If you really need to throw some rice this is your chance; throw that rice into a fine strainer and give it a quick rinse. Once you have rinsed your grain and satisfied your need to chuck that rice pour it into a pot with 1 1/2 cups of water (as you seasoned rice chefs out there know, the amount of water can vary slightly from grain to grain). Bring to a boil then stir and decrease heat to a low simmer for 20-25 minutes depending on your cook-top. Once the rice is tender fluff it with a fork and add in butter (or coconut oil), cilantro, lime juice, sea salt and black pepper.

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Serve and enjoy all of that flavor!

Thanks for reading and please share any comments or your experiences below. I love hearing feedback on these recipes so let me know how you like it! For more tasty recipes and other interesting blog entries follow me on Facebook!

Brooke Carragher, C.H.N- Certified Holistic Nutritional Consultant, Blogger, Gardener, Yogi, Educator and Food Lover.

Whole U Nutrition- A Whole U Approach To Wellness

Roasted Chick

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You need to get to know this chick. She’s fresh, hip and definitely worth your time. The type of chick you would call for a second dinner date.

 

Prep time: 30 minutes minutes
Cook time: 1 hr – 1 hr 30 minutes
Makes: 3-4 people depending on chick size

Ingredients:

1 Whole chicken
1 onion
1 lemon, juicedIMG_5667 (2)
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil or melted coconut oil
2 bay leaves
1/2 cup loosely packed fresh parsley
4 fresh sage leaves
1 tsp thyme
1 tsp chili flakes
2 cloves garlic
1 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp black pepper

First preheat your oven to 375 degrees. Next, throw all your ingredients (apart from the chicken – please don’t blend your chicken) into a blender or food processor. Blend until smooth and pour over that bird in a baking dish.

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Place it in the oven for 1 hr. Then turn down the temperature to 325 degrees and roast for another 15-30 minutes or until it’s done. A meat thermometer is the best tool to take out the guess work.

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Cover it up with foil and let it rest for 10 minutes so those juices can settle. Then carve it up and serve FS (that’s family-stlye) or fancy AF (you know what I’m talking about) if you’re trying to impress!

Thanks for reading and please share any comments or your experiences below. I love hearing feedback on these recipes so let me know how you like it! For more tasty recipes and other interesting blog entries follow me on Facebook!

Brooke Carragher, C.H.N- Certified Holistic Nutritional Consultant, Blogger, Gardener, Yogi, Educator and Food Lover.

Whole U Nutrition- A Whole U approach to wellness

Nacho Average Potato

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Potatoes…loaded. Need I say more? This recipe sprang from a nacho platter and a potato making sweet satisfying love. If that’s too graphic for you just call this recipe a “fusion of flavors”. These will have you saying “Muy deliciosa“! Look at you making a new recipe and learning Spanish.

 

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 45 minutes to 1 hr depending on your tuber
Serves: 4 people

Ingredients:

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4 medium sized potatoes or sweet potatoes
1 lb ground beef, chicken, turkey
1 large cloves garlic, minced
1 jalapeno, de-seeded/ finely chopped
1 tbsp cumin seeds, smashed
1 tbsp chili powder
1/2 tsp smoked paprika
1/4 cup water
Sea salt and Black pepper to taste
1 tbsp unrefined virgin coconut oil or grass-fed butter

Toppings:
Tomatoes, diced
Cheese, shredded
Lettuce, shredded
Chives or green onion, diced
Cilantro, rough chopped
Greek yogurt, dolloped
Lime, squeezed

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Take a fork and punch a few holes in your chosen tuber (that’s a potato folks). Place them in the oven and let them hang out in there until they are tender.

Next heat up a pan with coconut oil or butter. Once melted add in your ground meat. Let it  brown and once cooked thoroughly drain. You may find depending on the meat you use there is very little if anything to drain so you can skip this step. Now add in garlic, jalapeno, cumin, chili powder, smoked paprika, sea salt, black pepper and lastly water. Give it a good stir to get all the flavor bits on the bottom of the pan loosened. Cook for another few minutes until the garlic is soft and then take off the heat.

Take your baked potato or sweet potato and cut a little triangle wedge, lengthwise, at the top and remove it to make a place for you toppings to sit. Now start layering your fixings beginning with the ground meat and ending however you like.

Take a step back to admire your creation and Enjoy!

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Brooke Carragher, C.H.N- Certified Holistic Nutritional Consultant, Blogger, Gardener, Yogi, Educator and Food Lover.

Whole U Nutrition- A Whole U Approach To Wellness

Multi-Colored Carrots & Golden Wax Beans with Chipotle Lime Butter

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Don’t you feel like side dishes are underrated? Even though a side dish isn’t the main event of the meal doesn’t mean it has to be an afterthought. Au contraire (pardon my French…because I don’t speak it!) side dishes, even with just a touch of effort can complement and elevate any main. I mean we spend the bulk of our meal making time preparing the main dish, usually a protein, and then our side dishes, usually veggies, just end up steamed and seasoned and presto! Bon appetit (last time I promise). Well this time let’s spice it up a little, shall we? We’ll still keep it quick and simple-ish but this compound butter will take your veggie sides on a trip to yum-town. Bon voyage!

 

Prep time: 5 minutes
Cook time: 5- 7 minutes
Serves: 4 people

Ingredients:

25 golden wax beans
2 medium sized carrots, thinly sliced
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Chipotle Lime Butter:
1/2 cup unsalted grass-fed butter
1/2 lime, zested and cut into wedges for serving
1/4 tsp black pepper
1/4 cup fresh cilantro, minced
1/2 tsp chili powder
Sea salt to taste

Start out with room temperature butter; this makes it way easier to incorporate all those banging flavors. If you didn’t plan ahead and you have only cold fridge butter, just give up now. KIDDING! Just pop it in the microwave for 10-15 seconds to soften up. I’m usually pretty anti-microwave but on this one let’s just all agree to look the other way, OK?

Now this is where it gets complicated: Add all of those tasty ingredients into that butter and stir until it comes together.

Get out a piece of plastic wrap and lay it down on the counter. Spoon all of the chipotle lime butter you just made onto the plastic wrap and roll up it like a savory spicy butter burrito. Then tuck in the ends. Do not eat this burrito. That part comes later.

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Now that you’ve formed your butter into what I lovingly call a flavor tube just stick it in the fridge for 15 to 20 minutes. Here it will turn back into cold fridge butter 2.0.

Once your compound butter is hard you can slice off pieces as you need and it will keep in the refrigerator for 1- 2 weeks. That’s assuming you don’t just put it on everything because you’ll want to. It’s that good.

Butter’s done! Now we use it to flavor our veggies. Cut off a healthy slice of the chipotle lime butter and place it in a pre-heated pan. Add in beans and carrots; cook until vegetables are tender. I like to serve them with a touch more of the compound butter because YUM! and a squeeze of lime.

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Thanks for reading and please share any comments or your experiences below. I love hearing feedback on these recipes so let me know how you like it! For more tasty recipes and other interesting blog entries follow me on Facebook!

Brooke Carragher, C.H.N- Certified Holistic Nutritionist, Blogger, Gardener, Yoga Enthusiast, Educator and Food Lover.

Whole U Nutrition- A Whole U Approach To Wellness

Garden Chive Ravioli with Brown Butter Sauce

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I was watching Netflix…again. If you love cooking and eating amazing food Chefs Table is an awesome series you should watch! I’m always just blown away by the creativity of chefs and watching people working at something they are passionate about is truly inspiring.

Anyway, there I was just day dreaming about being a famous chef, cooking in a beautiful kitchen with an enormous garden and that’s when it happened! I had this overwhelming urge to make fresh pasta. If you’ve ever felt it, you know that there’s no fighting that wild pasta urge. If you’re reading this thinking I’m crazy, I urge you urgently: go make you some homemade pasta right now! Well, maybe read this first and then go. Because there isn’t much out there that is as satisfying, both to make and then more importantly to eat, than fresh pasta.

Let’s get a little bit crazy with it though. Seeing as how we just became professional armchair Netflix chefs, the world expects more from us than just a penne or some kind of ‘ini or ‘etti. You know what makes homemade pasta even better? Stuffing it with delicious shit (what? Badass professional armchair Netflix chefs pretty much have to curse. This is me now.).

So here’s where the fresh pasta idea evolves into ravioli and Voila! a new dish is born! I paired this earthy ravioli with a sweet potato puree and wilted Swiss chard.

Prep time: 30 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes
Makes: 24 large ravioli

Ingredients:

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Pasta dough:
2 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1 tsp sea salt
4 pasture raised eggs
1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup chives, finely chopped

Ravioli Filling:
2 cups mushrooms, finely chopped
1 onion, finely diced
6 cloves of garlic, minced
3 cups fresh spinach, rough chopped
1 tbsp butter or unrefined virgin coconut oil
1/2 cup parmesan cheese
Sea salt
Black pepper
1/4 cup white wine

Brown Butter Sauce:
4 tbsp. butter
2 cloves garlic, minced
Sea salt
Black pepper

Start with the pasta because it needs to rest while you make your filling. Get out a bowl and add your flour. Make a well in the center and add the eggs, sea salt, chives and olive oil to it. Using a fork whip those ingredients together until it becomes too hard to fork (forking tough) and then just get right in there with your hands. Transfer the pasta dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 10 minutes (I know it’s a long time but pasta dough is one of the kneadiest doughs out there…that was funny and we both know it). Once you are done kneading let your dough hang-out and rest for 30 minutes.

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Heat up a medium sauce pan with some butter or coconut oil. Then add the mushrooms, onions, garlic, spinach, sea salt and black pepper. Cook until lightly browned and add in white wine. While you’re at it pour yourself a glass too. It’ll help bring out your inner Italian pasta chef and you deserve that.

When the wine has evaporated add the contents of the pan to a food processor or blender and blend until creamy. Now add grated parmesan cheese, mix it up and set it aside to cool.

 So here we are, back at the dough. Your pasta dough should be well rested so divide it into 4 equal pieces. One-at-a-time either hand roll out the dough (which may be difficult) or use this fancy Pasta Machine (this option is much, much easier). If you’re using a pasta machine you’re going for a thickness of about a #5. Don’t try and get there the on first pass though! Slowly work down to it or you’ll clog the machine and need another glass of wine. If you’re hand rolling you want to work the dough as thin as you can roll it without tearing through. Ideally you’ll get it down to 1/8th of an inch thick. If you can’t, don’t sweat it. You’re making ravioli and it’s going to be awesome!

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Now that your dough is rolled out you place a tbsp of filling on the dough every 1-2 inches from one end to the middle. Fold the other half of the dough over the filling side.

Cut out your raviolis with either a ravioli cutter or a cup (like I used because as you will recall I’m a professional armchair Netflix chef and that’s how we roll). Pinch the edges finger style or use a fork – this is your call and I’m not going to boss you around on this one. Repeat with the rest of the dough and filling.

Lightly flour a cookie sheet and place the ravioli onto the sheet as you make them. Cover with plastic wrap and place them in the fridge until you are ready to cook them up.

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Fill a large pot with water, a touch of olive oil and a large pinch of sea salt. Fire up the burner and get it boiling! When it comes to a boil add in your ravioli. They’ll take about 5 minutes to cook so set a timer and start on your brown butter sauce.

In a medium sauce pan add butter, garlic, sea salt and black pepper. Let it cook until it starts to brown and then it take off the heat. Gently remove your ravioli from the water with a slotted spoon, plate them and top with brown butter sauce.

That’s it! Order up! You are a ravioli making genius, a professional armchair Netflix chef and it’s time to enjoy the fruits of your labor. And maybe one more glass of that white wine…

Thanks for reading and please share any comments or your experiences below. I love hearing feedback on these recipes so let me know how you like it! For more tasty recipes and other interesting blog entries follow me on Facebook!

Brooke Carragher, C.H.N- Certified Holistic Nutritionist, Blogger, Gardener, Yoga Enthusiast, Educator and Food Lover.

Whole U Nutrition- A Whole U approach to wellness

 

Beet Kvass

I’m not ashamed to admit it. Are you? You shouldn’t be. You ought to be proud of it! I’m proud of it! So say it with me: I Love Beets! Mmm mmm! Red beets, golden beets, purple beets – doesn’t matter what kind because they are all good. They taste delicious and they are really good for you too. Beets are loaded with antioxidants, powerful phytonutrients, nitric oxide which you can read more about here–> Nitric Oxide . Beets also contain high amounts of betaine which helps to protect against cell death in the body. Bottom line: we all need to incorporate more beets into our diets because beets rule. The only downside with beets is that sometimes it’s hard to fit them in. So this tricky spot is right where beet kvass comes in handy. Wait…beet what?

beet-kvass

 Beet kvass, lovely reader, is a kind of fermented juice, made primarily from beets, that is just amazing for your health. It’s certainly one of my favorite fermentables and if you get me started I just can’t say enough good things about it. My recipe is more than just beets though. It also includes ginger root and turmeric root and these two additions increase the anti-inflammatory properties of this powerful tonic and add more cancer fighting nutrients into your daily diet. Win-win.

Do you remember those cheesy infomercials with the catch phrase “Set it and forget it!”? Well those crafty slogan writers could have also been referring to making a batch of beet kvass. You basically toss a few simple ingredients into a salt brine and leave it alone for a week. That’s it. You’re done. It doesn’t get easier than this, folks.

Not only have I fallen in love with this tonic for the benefits to me and my digestive health but, in an unlikely and amusing turn of events, my dog has too! My pooch suffers from really dry skin and I have always had a hunch that just like me, it stems from her digestive health. So one day as an experiment, with my vets blessing of course,  I let her try some. She loved it and after a two weeks of beet kvass kibble, her skin really cleared up! Now I put it on her food once a day and if I hesitate, no word of a lie, she just stares from me to the food and back again until I pour it on.

You’ll need:
2 x large beet
1 x thumb-sized turmeric rootsIMG_5079
1 x thumb-sized ginger root
1/4 cup whey – Check out how to gather whey here—> Make Whey!

Brine:
1/2 gallon filtered water
2 tbsp. sea salt

Equipment:
1 x 1/2 gallon glass jar with metal ring
1 x silicon airlock
1 x thermometer gun
Check out more on equipment here—> Gearing Up For Fermentables

 

Get your brine on and bring 1/2 gallon of filtered water to a boil. Once boiling take off the heat and add salt; stirring until all that salt is dissolved. Let your brine sit until the surface temperature reaches 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

Cut up your turmeric, ginger and beets into large chunks. Add ginger and turmeric to your 1/2 gallon jar first then the beets to help keep them submerged. Now pour in the whey and slowly pour in the brine. Top with your silicon airlock and metal ring. Place in a dark place in your home or simply cover with a towel for 7 to 10 days. Feel free to taste the kvass to get familiar with the flavor change over the course of fermenting process. The taste when completed should be a touch salty, sweet a tad sour.

When you strain the first batch of beet kvass leave 10 oz of liquid and refill with more prepared and cooled brine. You can get two ferments out of the same beets, ginger and turmeric.

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I love to use beet kvass in dressings to replace the acidic component and add some sweetness or just taking it as a health shot daily. Side note my dog gets grumpy and sometimes refuses to eat her food if I dont include beet kvass on her food at night. It has greatly improved her coat and of course her digestive tract!

Thanks for reading and please share any comments or your experiences below. I love hearing feedback on these recipes so let me know how you like it! For more tasty recipes and other interesting blog entries follow me on Facebook!

Brooke Carragher, C.H.N- Certified Holistic Nutritionist, Blogger, Gardener, Yoga Enthusiast, Educator and Food Lover.

Whole U Nutrition- A Whole U approach to wellness

Who Wants To Get Pickled?

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I’m so stoked that this week during my Fermentation Fundamentals class we are focusing on pickling! I feel like I”m not alone when I say that pickles, especially (but not limited-to) dill cucumbers, have been gracing my charcuterie boards, held down an integral part of my midnight snackery and contributed to my many “I’m hungry… but I don’t know for what…” pondering moments. It’s a tough life being a snacker (not really although sarcasm is fun) but I think we can all agree that having some crisp pickles around makes the snack-life easier. And tastier. They’re also pretty great on sandwiches. Pickles: make them! It’s easier than you think.

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Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes
Makes: 1/2 gallon of delicious pickles!

Ingredients:

8 pickling cucumbers, quartered
3 tbsp. pickling spice
1/2 cup fresh dill
4-5 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1 organic black tea bag
6 tbsp. whey – Check out how to collect your Whey here—> http://wholeunutrition.ca/make-whey/

Brine:
2 tbsp. sea salt
1/2 gallon water

Equipment:
1/2 gallon glass jar
1 pickle pebble
1 airlock
1 metal jar ring
1 Temperature gun
Want to learn about gear check out this post—>http://wholeunutrition.ca/gearing-up-for-fermentables/

 

So we’ll start with the brine. You’ll need an infrared temperature gun (like this one) for this part so keep one handy. Get your water boiling and then stir in the sea salt until it dissolves. BOOM! You’ve made some brine. Nice.  Now you just set the brine aside and let it cool down to 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

Cut up those cukes into quarters, lengthwise. Pretty sure someone once called these “pickle-spears” which is kind of bad-ass. I can dig it. Slice that garlic too and stuff it and your spears into your jar. Add the spices, whey, tea and fresh dill. Add in the cooled brine making sure to leave about an inch of head room at the top of the jar. Add a Pickle Pebble or weight of some kind to keep those cukes completely submerged in brine and top the jar with the air lock.

 Place the jar in a warm dark spot for 3-5 days where your cukes can just hang out and contemplate becoming pickled and delicious. This is the jar that will change your pickle-spear-ience (see what I did there?) in amazing ways! So take good care of it and when they are ready I encourage you to eat them all in one sitting! Wait, no, that’s bad advice; at least two sittings and you don’t have to share if you don’t want to!

Enjoy!

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Thanks for reading and please share any comments or your experiences below. I love hearing feedback on these recipes so let me know how you like it! For more tasty recipes and other interesting blog entries follow me on Facebook!

Brooke Carragher, C.H.N- Certified Holistic Nutritionist

Whole U Nutrition- A Whole U approach to wellness

Make Whey!

When I first began fermenting, the process of gathering whey seemed … whey too complicated… Ha! OK, so maybe that was a little lame but we both know you smiled. At least I hope you did because this post was just begging for puns. And really, who am I to deny a blog post a joke or five? Anyway, as I was saying; now that I’ve actually done it, I realize it couldn’t be any easier. In case you were wondering, the definition of whey is “the water from milk left over after the formation of curds”. The only process of gathering whey that I was aware of was to utilize raw milk and since I live in a major city the chances of me finding a steady supply are pretty much slim to none. Sadly unable to moo-ve Bessy the dairy-cow into my cozy suburban backyard I was forced to search for another whey to make it. I was pleasantly surprised to find that I didn’t have to look that long or hard to find a whey simple method of collecting whey from yogurt! One important thing that I want to mention before I go any further is that when choosing your yogurt it should be an organic, probiotic and good quality plain yogurt. Anything else would be whey out of line here so no flavors, colors, sweeteners or thickeners please. You see, you’ll need those oh-so helpful probiotics to kick start your batches of fermented goodness regardless of the variety of fermentable it is you intend to make. I also recommend staying away from thick Greek-style yogurt because it doesn’t have a very high moisture content which results in whey less whey.

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*Authors note: I do not apologize for my extremely unnecessary use of whey puns in this post…or any other.

 

You’ll need these:
1 Small container organic plain probiotic yogurt
Cheesecloth
String
1 Bowl

How-To:

This method of whey gathering is easy; all you have to do is make a bundle of yogurt, hang it up and wheyt. First double layer the cheesecloth making roughly a 6 inch by 6 inch square (6″ x 6″). Your bundle will start dripping whey right a-whey so lay your cheesecloth square into your bowl and then begin spooning yogurt into the center.  Once you have filled the center of that cheesecloth with yogurt, gather the edges and make a cute little yogurt bundle. Tie the top of your bundle closed with a string and tie the other end up somewhere so it can hang above the bowl. I like to use a cupboard handle for this. It works really well as long as you pick a cupboard that you won’t need to open too often! Now you just wheyt for all of the whey to drip out into the bowl. Depending on the consistency of your yogurt this can take anywhere from a couple hours to overnight. I often just let it hang overnight and then I can get started on my recipe the next day which is ultra convenient.

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Once your little bundle of yogurt is done dripping you”ll have a thick Greek-style yogurt left over to make dips, spreads or just to eat with fresh fruit, nuts and seeds! If you dont use the whey right a-whey just store it in an airtight jar and stick it in the fridge. It should last up to 6 months or so.

You can use this whey in your fermented food recipes, in smoothies for added protein or to soak your beans and grains.

Thanks for reading and please share any comments or your experiences below. I love hearing feedback on these recipes so let me know how you like it! For more tasty recipes and other interesting blog entries follow me on Facebook!

Brooke Carragher, C.H.N- Certified Holistic Nutritionist

Whole U Nutrition- A Whole U Approach To Wellness

Gearing up For Fermentables

I’m borderline positive that I have mentioned my love of and, if we’re being honest here, obsession with fermentables before. But, just for a moment, let’s pretend that I haven’t, shall we? Not only do they add a plethora (I”ve been waiting to use that word for close to a week now!) of beneficial bacteria to your digestive system but they also add a depth of flavor to many dishes that just can’t be imitated. Fermentables are old. Like really, really, really OLD. I’m talking Neolithic times old and if you don’t believe me, check out what this guy, Michael Pollan, has to say about it.

Check out his books here–>Michael Pollan

They’ve been around for so long that most people are so used to them they don’t notice them in their diet!

The reason I bring this up is because the term “fermentables” to a non-fermenter – I can make up words, it’s my blog – isn’t really all that clear or appetizing. So just in case you were curious, when I say “fermentables” I mean all the really good stuff. Pickles, kimchi, sauerkraut, cheese, mustard, ketchup, kefir, kombucha, hot sauce, salami, wine and beer! Oh my! And those are just some of the things, the delicious “Hey I eat that all the time!” things that I’m taking about when you read “fermentables”.

As much as I absolutely love to fill my diet and the meal plans of my clients with all of the healthy fermentables I can, I was feeling as though I didn’t have the time or the know how to make them myself. The whole process just seemed complicated and intimidating so naturally I decided to just go ahead and jump in with both feet! I had some great conversations with a few select fermentation enthusiasts (I will name no names…love you Mom…) who assured me it wasn’t all that time consuming and would help me save some grocery money. With my rubber arm twisted I enrolled myself in a four week fermentation course called “Chef Franks Fermentation Fundamentals”. My aim is to expand my horizons and perhaps stop spending so much of my monthly grocery budget on kombucha…

Check out the course here–>http://www.threelilyfarm.com/fermentation/

frank

So for me, one of the coolest parts of taking this course is that I get to keep all of you gorgeous, intelligent, witty and hopefully hungry readers in the loop as I go. Fair warning: in the weeks to come, I’m getting pickled and so are you! I’m going to try and post a fair number of my fermented recipes for you and I encourage you all to try them for yourselves. If you have any questions, leave them in the comments or get at me on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. I’ll try to be as helpful as I can and OMG I can’t wait to learn to make Kombucha!!!

Here are my thoughts on Week 1:

Gathering the Gear – I was starting from scratch and I didn’t have an extravagant budget to put into any fancy expensive equipment. Translation: I’m rich in enthusiasm and sarcasm… not so much in the cash-on-hand department. So I did some asking and found that, like any hobby, there are luxury items that are nice to have and there are the non-negotiable things you need to complete the fermentation process and pass go. Non-negotiable items include glass jars, airlocks, weights (Pickle Pebbles!), infrared temperature gun (I know a gun right? So bad ass! I totally do the Charlie’s Angels thing when I use it) and of course ingredients to ferment. So I’ll run through these below.

Glass Jars – Either save them from canned goods you purchase and snag some metal ring style lids or you can order some from Amazon or  just head on down to Canadian Tire and grab a flat of gallon jars and lids to go with them.

Check them out here–>1 Gallon Glass Jars

128_oz_Widemouth_Jars_110_CT

Airlocks– You have a couple good options here and really it’s going to come down to personal preference.

On the left we have a water seal airlock. This one I have not used but I heard through the grapevine that they work really well.

On the right we have a water-less silicon airlock that I have been using and really like. It’s simple, colorful and hilariously nipple shaped. Win-win-win!

The water airlock will run you a little more than the water-less airlock so that’s something to keep in mind.

Check them out here–>Airlocks
airlock

siliconairlock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weights– You are looking for Pickle Pebbles or weights here. I went with the Pickle Pebbles because they’re obviously awesome and it’s fun to say: Pickle Pebbles. Seriously though, these are really functional just make sure that you order the size that matches your jars. Whatever you choose to use it will just help to keep those vegetables below the liquid in the jar so that everything is airtight and no undesirable bacteria grow. As a fermenter and pickler, undesirable bacteria is your #1 enemy. If Pickle Pebbles aren’t your thing you can also find stones in your outdoor spaces that will work just as well. Be sure to boil them for 5 minutes prior to using.

Check them out here–> Pickle Pebbles- Wide Mouth

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Temperature gun– You’ve got to be packing heat if you want to ferment. This piece of high tech infrared gear is essential for ensuring your ferment is sitting at the right temperature. Why do I care about this, you may ask? Proper temperature is crucial to get a proper ferment filled with good bacteria vs. that pesky undesirable bacteria. These things aren’t all that expensive and they have so many perks! You can pretend you are a sniper or play with the cat like it’s a laser pointer. Full disclosure: I walked around my house for a solid 2 days measuring random temperatures of inanimate objects. I learned that with few exceptions the room really is room temperature. Riveting stuff here, folks.

Check them out here–>Temperature Gun
index

 

I ordered everything on Amazon because of free shipping and competitive pricing that beats the big-box stores where I live. I try pretty hard to support local businesses with my grocery shopping but with things like this it can be hard to justify double the price for some of these items. If you feel better about it have a look around and see what you end up finding.

Once I had all of my gear taken care of the course itself provided some great videos and lots of discussion to get me comfortable with the whole process. I’m a visual and kinesthetic learner (in plain English: a do-er) so I found this course really matched up with my learning style. Chef Frank also shows you around his massive garden, which I’m not ashamed to admit I’m mega jelly of btw, and he shows you how to utilize your fermentables once they are well “pickled”.

Ok, so that was the longest one I’ll write on this, I promise. Now gather all the gear you need and stay tuned for some fermentable recipes!

Whole U Nutrition Fermentables hands on classes coming Summer 2016!

Thanks for reading and please share any comments or your experiences below. I love hearing feedback on these posts so let me know how you like it! For tasty recipes and other interesting blog entries follow me on Facebook!

Brooke Carragher, C.H.N- Certified Holistic Nutritionist

Whole U Nutrition- A Whole U Approach To Wellness

 

Nostalgic Porcupines

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Porcupines bring with them lots of nostalgia for me. They were the quick go to for my mom and many moms in the 80’s along with jems such as crimped hair, track suits and blue eyeliner. The main difference to point out here is that even though you don’t set up fake tea parties with your cabbage patch dolls and jam out to your walk-man anymore good food never goes out of style.

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Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 15- 20 minutes
Serves: 2-3 people

Ingredients:

Meatballs:
1/2 lb ground beef ( Substitute with any meat you like)
1 pasture raised, cage free egg
1 tsp cumin seeds
1/2 tsp rosemary
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp fresh ground black pepper
1 cup cooked brown or wild rice

Sauce:
1 can full fat coconut milk
4 oz mushrooms
1 small onion, diced
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tsp fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp green cardamon
1/2 tsp white pepper
sea salt to taste
1 tbsp unrefined, virgin coconut oil

If your like me and porcupines brings back memories of the 80’s then an integral part of making these is to blast Sledgehammer by Peter Gabriel and get to work. In case you dont have the link handy —> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g93mz_eZ5N4

Snag a glass baking dish and grease it up with coconut oil; set it aside. Grab a large mixing bowl and toss all your meatball ingredients into it. Stir until incorporated whilst singing or jamming out to the epic 80’s solo that happens in this song. Form into a little bit bigger than golf sized balls and line them up in the baking dish.

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Now lets get to the sauce. Turn up the music and heat a medium sized pan with 1 tbsp. coconut oil. Add in mushrooms, onion, garlic and green cardamon; saute until lightly browned. Add in coconut milk, lemon juice, pepper and salt. Once it starts bubbling you want to keep it like that for 2 minutes or so. Now pour it all over those meatballs and place the dish in a 400 degree oven for 15 – 20 minutes.

Serve and Enjoy!

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Thanks for reading and please share any comments or your experiences below. I love hearing feedback on these recipes so let me know how you like it! For more tasty recipes and other interesting blog entries follow me on Facebook!

Brooke Carragher, C.H.N- Certified Holistic Nutritionist

Whole U Nutrition- A Whole U approach to wellness